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Spine Conditions

Microdiscectomy

Microdiscectomy

Microdiscectomy is usually performed under general anesthesia. You will lie on your stomach for the procedure. A small incision around 1 to 1½-inches will be made directly over the affected disc, usually in the midline of your lower back, which is identified by X-ray imaging.

Fracture of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine

Fracture of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine

Thoracic and lumbar spine fractures are usually treated with bracing for 6 to 12 weeks with a gradual increase in activity. Surgery is performed in cases of displacement of fractures, and significant injury to the adjoining ligaments, intervertebral discs or nerves.

Lumbar Radiculopathy

Lumbar Radiculopathy

Back pain is a common condition affecting approximately 80% of the population at some point in their lives. The area usually affected is the lower back (lumbar region) as it bears most of the upper body’s weight. Trauma to the spine, age and overuse can result in deterioration of the vertebral bones and joints or bulging of the discs.

Lumbar Herniated Disc

Lumbar Herniated Disc

A herniated disc is a condition in which the outer fibers (annulus) of the intervertebral disc are damaged, causing the soft inner material of the nucleus pulposus to rupture out of its space. It is the most common cause of lower back pain and pain that radiates down the leg (radiculopathy).

Lumbar Stenosis

Lumbar Stenosis

Lumbar stenosis is the compression of spinal nerves caused by the narrowing of the spinal canal. It is one of the common causes of lower back pain. Spinal stenosis can also affect the spine in the neck region.

Spondylolysis

Spondylolysis

Spondylolysis is a stress fracture in the vertebra that may progress into spondylolisthesis, a condition where the vertebra gets displaced from the spinal column. Spondylolysis is the cause of frequent low back pain in children. It is more common among children and teenagers who participate actively in sports such as football, weightlifting, and gymnastics.

Cervical Spondylosis

Cervical Spondylosis

Cervical spondylosis, also called arthritis of the neck, is an age-related medical condition characterized by deterioration of spinal joints, vertebrae, discs, and ligaments in your neck.

Back Pain

Back Pain

Back pain or backache is the pain felt in the back that may originate from damage to the muscles, nerves, bones, joints or other structures in the spine. Back pain is one of the most common medical problems experienced by most people at some time in their life. It can be acute, usually lasting from a few days to a few weeks, or chronic, lasting for more than three months.

Spondylolisthesis

Spondylolisthesis

Spondylolisthesis is the displacement of the vertebral disc from the spinal column. Outward (forward) displacement is termed as anterolisthesis and inward (backward) displacement is termed as retrolisthesis. This condition is often preceded by spondylolysis, a degenerative condition of the vertebra.

Sciatica

Sciatica

The sciatic nerve is the longest nerve in your body. It begins in the lower back and extends through the buttocks down the back of each leg to the thighs and feet.

Scoliosis

Scoliosis

Scoliosis is a condition characterized by the abnormal curvature of the spine that causes a deviation to one side. It causes a physical deformity, making the spine look like the letter “C” or “S” instead of the letter “I”. Scoliosis can affect either the mid or lower back. Scoliosis of the mid back is more common. Scoliosis can occur at any age.

Degenerative Disc Disease

Degenerative Disc Disease

Degenerative disc disease (DDD) refers to the gradual deterioration of the intervertebral discs between the vertebrae. DDD is a misnomer as it is not actually a disease but a condition that affects the strength, resilience and structural integrity of the intervertebral discs due to advancing age, trauma, injury, repetitive movement, improper posture or poor body mechanics. DDD is commonly seen in individuals over 50 years of age. Most of them are usually not aware of their condition until they are examined for some other related health condition.

Cauda Equina Syndrome

Cauda Equina Syndrome

What Cauda equina syndrome is an emergency condition characterized by persistent severe lower back pain caused by the compression of a bundle of spinal nerves (cauda equina) at the end of the spinal cord (lower back and hip region). If not treated promptly, it can lead to permanent paralysis of the legs, or bowel, bladder, and sexual problems.

Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction

Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction

Sacroiliac joint dysfunction or sacroiliac joint pain is one of the common causes of low back pain.

Adjacent Segment Disc Disease

Adjacent Segment Disc Disease

Adjacent segment disc disease is associated with new degeneration symptoms, but may be asymptomatic and identified only during a follow-up imaging test. Sometimes, clinical evidence of degeneration may not accompany radiographic changes.

Lordosis

Lordosis

Lordosis places greater pressure on the spine causing pain, muscle spasm, bladder or bowel difficulties, or numbness and tingling sensations.

Spine Trauma

Spine Trauma

Spine trauma is defined as an injury or damage to any region of the spine.  The spine extends from the neck to the lower back and consists of the vertebral bones which surround and protect the spinal cord. Damage to the spinal cord or spinal nerves can cause changes in sensation, strength, and other body functions.

Sagittal Imbalance

Sagittal Imbalance

The spine has three natural curves when viewed from the side, an inward curve in the neck and lower spine called lordosis and an outward curve in the mid-back called kyphosis. Normal spine curvature keeps your head in line with your pelvis so that the stresses on your spine are well balanced. Certain medical conditions, however, affect the curvature of the spine so that the curves become too flat or too pronounced.

Cervical Radiculopathy/Myelopathy

Cervical Radiculopathy/Myelopathy

Cervical radiculopathy can result in pain, numbness, or weakness in the shoulder, arm, wrist or hand. Myelopathy presents with weakness, problems manipulating small objects and difficulty with a normal gait.

Neck Pain

Neck Pain

Common neck pain may occur from muscle strain or tension from everyday activities including poor posture, prolonged use of a computer and sleeping in an uncomfortable position.

Cervical Fracture

Cervical Fracture

Cervical fractures are common in motor vehicle accidents, sports activities and falls. The second, sixth and seventh cervical vertebrae are frequently involved in fractures, which may injure the spinal cord.

Cervical Herniated Disc

Cervical Herniated Disc

The cervical region consists of 7 cervical vertebrae (C1-C7), with intervertebral discs between each vertebra that function to provide flexibility to the backbone. Intervertebral discs are soft, compressible structures consisting of a hard-outer ring called the annulus and a gel-like center called the nucleus.

Cervical Stenosis

Cervical Stenosis

Cervical stenosis refers to the narrowing of the spinal canal that protects the spinal cord and its branching nerves.

Thoracic Disc Herniation

Thoracic Disc Herniation

Thoracic herniation disc is a condition in which the outer fibers (annulus) of the intervertebral disc are damaged causing the soft inner material of the nucleus pulposus to rupture out of its space.

Low Back Pain

Low Back Pain

Low back pain is often a common symptom of many disease conditions and the back pain may range from simple or dull pain to sudden and sharp pain. If the pain persists for a few days, it is acute pain whereas if it continues for more than 3 months, it is considered as chronic pain. In most cases, low back pain may resolve without any treatment, however, if it persists for more than 3 days, medical intervention is necessary.

  • Oregon Medical Association
  • American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
  • Scoliosis Research Society
  • North American Spine Society